Fair Harvest Festival of No Waste

So after weeks of preparation bashing, baking and brewing, we finally woke up on the big day like kids on Christmas Morning! We were so excited to showcase our: Sauerkrauts, Pickles, Organic Gluten-Free Breads, Juns, Dehydrates and Organic Apple Cider Vinegar and wasted no time (see what I did there?) getting our babies on display. Our first time on the other side of the stall!

On the other side of the stall...
Connor had a strong realisation of how much his life has changed when he walked passed a car radio, transmitting the third day of the first Ashes Cricket Test. There is no way he would’ve missed a single moment of action a few years ago. The call to making a healthy contribution to the world is one that we have tried to answer and it has consumed us over the past couple of years. It is a decision that has changed our lives dramatically in different ways and although it can be a bit scary sometimes when we hardly recognise our new forms, events like the Festival of No Waste help confirm to us that we are on the right track.

We met so many like-minded people, so many folk becoming more conscious of their health who are mustering the courage to make the necessary steps towards achieving their goals and understanding that creating a healthy gut flora is one of the first keys to unlocking vitality.
There were also many people who are interested in becoming more empowered and who want to learn how to make these fermented eco-systems themselves. No need to buy expensive probiotic pills when you have the knowledge to create your own medicine.
That’s why we will be running our first SAUERKRAUT WORKSHOP at Fair Harvest Permaculture in the near future and will let you know once we have figured out a date and a format. We are really excited to get this off the ground and start educating people on how to build a more alive version of themselves by upgrading their micro-biome.

We had so much positive feedback on our Sauerkrauts and Breads that people made us promise that we would let them access our surplus. It has really got us thinking about operating on a bit bigger scale, especially after seeing all the inspiring people who have recognised their gifts and the areas in which they can make a positive contribution to the cause of creating more healthy models of behaving and acting in the world. To see people “going for it!” was very encouraging and has left a vision of possibility in our minds.

Dancing to Charlie

Having a big shake down to Charlie Mgee was a perfect way to end the day and move our bodies in rhythm with all the other bodies who helped make the event such a powerful meeting place for people who have had enough of the current self-destructive models of operation in this world. The festival of No Waste was such a beautiful invention and we are so thankful to Jodie and Do, who are doing their part to keep a larger dream alive in our hearts, a dream of rebuilding and inhabiting a healthy home planet.

As always, we are reminded that, “Small and Slow Solutions” is one of the building blocks to creating long lasting, sustainable and regenerative change and we sincerely hope that the seeds planted at the festival grow in to giant old grow forests.

With Love and Hope
Stay Vital
Connor and Marta

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Towards my final destination – Copenhagen here I come! October, 2015

Direction – Copenhagen

So here I was on the road again! I felt sad to leave Prästabonnens Gård, but on the other hand I was very excited about beginning the last part of my cycling journey and reaching my final destination – Denmark. I had never been to Denmark either and I dreamt about visiting Copenhagen. I heard so many good things about this city and that together with Amsterdam it was the most bicycle friendly city in Europe (or the whole wide world?) After going to Amsterdam in May, which completely possessed my heart and is ranked by now as my second favorite visited city in the world, I was very curious about the famous Danish capital.

I was lucky again to find a place in Copenhagen, where eventually I was about to stay for almost a week. It was thanks to the bike polo/messenger community that I contacted few days before my arrival and asked if anyone could host me for a few nights. Trine, a messenger girl, replied to me and suggested that I should stay longer so that I could race with them in Alleycat, which they were organizing for Halloween. Of course I couldn’t say no to such an invitation! Thrilled with a vision of staying within the bicycle community, riding in an alley and hopefully playing some polo and having lots of time to visit the city, I started peddling towards Denmark.

Last days in Sweden – Lund, Malmö, Helsingborg

 Since I still had plenty of time and Suzanne offered that I could stay in her apartment in Lund, I divided my last part of journey into 5 days of cycling. This way I could peacefully enjoy my last kilometers through Swedish lands and do some sightseeing in the cities on the way.

I stayed for a night in Lund, which is the oldest city in present-day Sweden and well known for its University. Walking the streets of Lund I was imagining Suzanne living and teaching here. It’s a very pleasant and quite small city; I think I would enjoy studying there.

The next day I cycled to Malmö. It seemed very different from what I had always imagined. It is the third biggest city in Sweden, and I have no bloody idea why I thought it would be smaller and maybe a more cozy, more fishery-town style… I was very wrong; my imagination sometimes misleads me big time 🙂 It is actually a pretty modern city, a cultural and economical center of the southern part of Sweden. From Malmö leads the longest bridge in Europe that connects Sweden with Denmark. However, it’s not possible yet to cross it with bicycle and many people advised me that taking ferry in Helsingborg is better for the ride views, so I chose the later option. My very hospitable Couchsurfing host surprised me by taking me for a dinner to… his grandmother’s home! He explained to me that he promised her he would fix something in her flat and that he usually ate meals with her every now and then. It was a super nice experience to have such an insight in a usual day routine of a Swedish family and their relationships. His grandma was absolutely lovely; she cooked a nice meal and showed me an album with newspaper clips about the history of Malmö that she’s been collecting through years. All of a sudden it made me think of my grandparents and how I missed having them around.

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Views from the road

I spent the afternoon and next morning walking around the city and in the early afternoon I took off to my next Couchsurfing stop. The route was very nice; from time to time I was cycling close to the coastline from where I could see shapes of Denmark’s shores. I arrived after sundown at my host’s place. She lived in a truly lovely house in the woods. I have to admit that for a moment I was worried that I wouldn’t find it as there where many similar looking houses and that I would get stuck in the darkness of the wilderness but I managed as always. It turned out that she was a super nice fellow cyclist, so we shared our biking experiences over the dinner. In the morning shortly after sunrise we split and I cycled my last part of Swedish route.

Wow, I was almost done with my trip. From day one, almost two months ago when I arrived in Sweden, I managed to cycle over 800 km and pass through so many distinct places and meet so many interesting new people that I was feeling a bit sad that it was nearly the end of it. If only the weather was warmer I would definitely cycle further, maybe down south Denmark up to Hamburg in Germany where my friend from childhood was living. Well, it will have to be next time as I’m sure there will be next time, somewhere, somehow 🙂

Now being even closer to my destination I could see Denmark’s coastlines clearer. How exciting!

My last stop in Sweden was Helsingborg, a town that is the country’s closest point to Denmark with only 4 km dividing both borders. My Couchsurfer was not Swedish but Hungarian and it was interesting to hear about his experiences as a foreigner living in this country. He showed me around the town that has pretty views over Helsingør, the Danish city on the other side of the Øresund. We ate Thai food and watched a documentary about ancient civilizations that followed with curious discussion on that matter.

denmark on the horizon
Helsingborg with Denmark on the horizon

Farewell Sweden, welcome Denmark!

 The next day before saying “See you around!” to Sweden I sat down in the harbor for a while. I thought of the fact that I’ve been super lucky all the way during my trip. All the people I met were very hospitable and open-minded; each and every one was interesting and very different from each other and for sure I won’t forget them. I wish I could tell you in more detail about all of them, but that would take ages 🙂 Well, it was time for Denmark!

crossing the border
Crossing the border – Sweden on the right / Denmark on the left

The ride in the ferry was super quick; in about 25 minutes I was already on the other side of the Øresund strait. Hello Denmark, so good to meet you finally! The day was very windy, but the route was amazing. All the way to Copenhagen I had a neat cycling lane and the path led mostly by the coast. Stopping by the beach for a snack and watching kite surfers I rested for the last time before reaching my final destination. I was totally astonished by the cycling indications throughout the road that kept me perfectly navigated. And the fact that all the cars I saw on the way were parked either on the street or on the pedestrian’s sidewalk, but never on the bike lane, was truly impressive! Wow, I already felt instant love for Danish culture.

Cph – the capital of bicycles

cph i made it
Nyhavn harbor

 I arrived in Copenhagen at last! Wow and wow again – so many bicycles and bike tracks everywhere that I almost got lost twice before reaching my host’s place. Trine was a Danish bike messenger and lived with her best friend Boline and four foreign students – Italian, Norwegian, Romanian and Spanish. It was a nice flat and super nice people who right away made me feel comfortable at their home as if it was my own.

In the evening Trine gave me a quick bike tour through downtown’s main sightseeing points and took me to a dinner with her friends and some Finnish students. On the way she told me a bit about the city’s cycling rules, culture and infrastructure. We rode the busiest cycle street in the capital, Nørrebrogade, that is about 3 km long, which directly links a couple locations and the city center and in the rush hours the bicycle traffic is tremendous. Statistics say that daily it is used by around 36,000 cyclists. Nice. In the next few days I rode this street at least twice a day.

The next day before work Trine took me to The Little Mermaid, which turned out to be much smaller than the one we have in Warsaw and to Nyhavn Harbor that is colored with shore-side homes and tall ships docked along the quays. During that day and the following ones I cycled the streets of Copenhagen back and forward, learning my way through it, visiting key places on the map of the city: National Gallery of Denmark, famous Christiania, hippie zone, Ørestad district with its modern architecture, coffee places and messenger meeting points. But mostly I saw more streets, buildings and bicycles than anything else during my stay 🙂

graffiti cph
Norrebrogade street

Bike messengers community and alleycat

 On Friday evening Trine took me to their usual bike messenger hang out in the city center. We had a few beers and great laughs. I quickly learnt that Danish people are very straightforward, funny, nice and easy-going, super cool actually.

Saturday was the Halloween and the Alleyween – the biggest alleycat (an informal bicycle race that usually always takes place in cities and normally is organized by bicycle messengers – loads of super fun!) in Denmark annually organized on that very occasion by members of Copenhagen messenger community. Last time I rode in an alley was back in Warsaw probably about 4 years ago, so I was very excited but also very afraid of it. It was organized at night and I didn’t know the city at all. However, Trine found me an awesome teammate, Emma, an ex-messenger who turned out to be suuuuper fast and good at racing. Together with her super nice friend Jody we created a cool team of three. They knew the city very well and rode like crazy, so I had a tough time trying to keep up with their pace feeling a bit like a third wheel, but hell, it was so much fun! We raced for about 2 hours and 30+ km throughout Copenhagen; there were 44 teams, 90+ riders and 10 checkpoints. For me that was the biggest alley I ever raced. Even though we didn’t arrive first (surprised, right?) Emma and me, dressed as Malificient, a beautiful evil mistress from Disney, we won a prize for our costumes. The next day I had also quite a hangover after the afterparty as you might imagine.

Unfortunately I didn’t get the chance to play bike polo since the pick up games were very postponed but at least I met some of the players. A few years back I met in Warsaw on a tournament two Danish polo players and now I happily discovered that one of the guys is still in the game and remembers me. Reunions after many years are always a nice experience and so it was this time. I was impressed of how their polo/messenger community works well together organizing bicycle workshops for children and other events of that sort. Really nice and open people with good attitude and teamwork. I hope I will have a chance to visit them again one day.

A souvenir and a final countdown

 bike tat 2I almost forgot about one more little detail. I got myself a present in Copenhagen – a new race bike tattooed on my right wrist. On the beginning of my journey I promised myself that I would get a bike tattoo if I manage to get all the way to Denmark on two wheels and I did! From Nynashamn in Sweden to Copenhagen in Denmark; almost 900 km, 13 couchsurfing hosts + Trine and 2 WWOOF farms. Quite an extraordinary experience. Now, this bike will always remind me of these two months in Scandinavia that were filled with lots of learning, thinking, reflecting and analyzing, but also enjoying, resting and relaxing. The route was filled with beautiful and happy moments, but also sometimes with difficult and stressful ones. I had been fighting with my thoughts many times, pushed myself to the limits and learnt to enjoy the best I can whatever comes on my way. It was a new and powerful lesson and now I was about to go back to Barcelona and face reality. Soon I would have to make a decision about what I want to next – look for a new job in Barcelona or hit the road again.

So I left Copenhagen profoundly touched by kindness of the people I met on my way and thankful for their help and hospitality. I loved the city. Even though it was cloudy for the most of my stay, I felt good in it. It is interesting and has a character. But I missed Barcelona too and was looking forward to see it again. See you hopefully soon Scandinavia, thank you for having me and hello again Barcelona!

scnadinavia map 2.2
From Nynashamn to Copenhagen!

 

 

Prästabonnens Gård Part Two 9-24 October 2015

Preparing garden for the next year – harvesting, fields and deep beds

Since it was already halfway through October, in Sweden the weather was getting colder with each day and the days were getting also shorter. It was about time to prepare for the winter. I began harvesting carrots, beetroots, and broad beans and leaving a few plants like lettuce. As a big carrot lover I can honestly say that carrots from Prästabonnens Gård were the best I ever had; flavorous and juicy, deliciously crunchy, big and some times of funny shapes – perfect to me. Beetroots were super tasty too, so one evening I cooked two Polish dishes made of them. After harvesting I began to prepare the soil for the winter and next season – first I weeded it and later dug hole by hole of about 50 cm per 1 m length and 5 cm deep which I filled with a bit of compost, the soil previously dug out and after finishing the entire field, I covered it with fallen leaves. This way the organic matter enriches the soil and the leaves protect it from the weather, weeds and birds.

garden 1

garden 2                       garden 3

When it comes to raised deep beds, I dug deeper holes of about 10-20 cm depth, put the layer of compost, covered it with leaves and charcoal and the rest of the soil, finally spread on the top a layer of fallen leaves. This way the prepared fields and beds would wait for the planting season in spring. In the garden I also covered the surface around all the currant bushes with leaves.

beds
Raised deep beds

carotts

Storing vegetables

We stored in the cellar most of the harvested carrots and beetroots. To keep them safe from rotting, slacks and other insects I put the veggies in plastic boxes with small holes on the bottom (for the air circulation) in repeated layers of veggies scattered with charcoal (for protection) and leaves spread on the top (to separate the layers.) Prepared like this, carrots and beetroots can be stored through autumn and winter without a problem, I was told.

Compost

I was impressed wcomposterith the quality and richness of the soil made from the compost. Folke built his two-bin composter with removable bricks made of LECA (Light Expanded Clay Aggregate.) It was large and deep, divided in two sections with a net and protected with a sliding cover. First they use one of the bins and once it is full of organic matter they switch to the other one and scatter from time to time a bit of charcoal on top of it. Worms working from bottom to top easily can move between the sections, and to keep it moistened, if it doesn’t rain they water it a bit. Folke told me that in approximately 6 months, good and rich soil is created. When I used it for the fields I noticed that its composition was moist and there were many worms in it; it looked very good to me.

Aquaponics and sour dough bread

In Prästabonnens Gård I saw aquaponics for the first time. Folke designed this very curious construction. But what does aquaponics mean you probably wonder? Well basically it was a greenhouse with a design of a fish tank and connected to it pipes, which circulate the water between the bottom and upper section of plants that grow among little stones and bits of soil. Fish purify the water and add their droppings that enrich it with nutrients. In this way, my hosts cultivate tomatoes, peppers and physalis fruit. It looked really impressive.

aquaponics cycle

As I mentioned before Folke is a really good cook and he likes also to make various preserves from fruits like apple mousse, cranberry syrups, jams, and pickled vegetables. Together we pickled beetroots and made sour dough bread. I have never before baked bread in my life and I was happy to find out that it is actually quite an easy job. In this case the crucial thing was to have the sour dough starter, which we used for the bread.

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Sour dough bread we baked

Bird and bat watchers

Since both of my hosts were bird and bat watchers and Suzanne was regularly registering her observations on birds’ migration, once she took me with her on her monthly round. We went on bikes stopping in the observation points previously marked by her and watched through binoculars the birds. The route was a couple kilometers long and very beautiful, circling around the lake and going into the woods. Later on, Suzanne wrote down her remarks and sent them back to the University of Lund where they were analyzed and registered together with reports from other parts of Sweden. Suzanne used to work at this University before, but teaching Linguistics. The other day she also took me to an old forest on the outskirts of Södra Rörum where we looked for trees where bats could live and placed in them bat-homes. It will help the ongoing research of bats that inhabit this part of the country. On the weekend of my departure my hosts were holding a reunion of their “bat friends” with whom they shared their observations and analyzed together their findings. We spoke about it on various occasions and I have to say that I never though that these creatures were so interesting.

Two weeks at Prästabonnens Gård went by in no time. Many times the thought of staying with Suzanne and Folke for a longer period crossed my mind. I definitely would love to do it and maybe one day I will ask them if that would be possible. In any case I hope to visit them again one day, as the experience was superb; they are wonderful and open-minded couple with vast knowledge on various topics and I really enjoyed spending time in their company. Encouraged and with my new motivation and skills I pushed forward to Copenhagen to complete my journey.

 

Prästabonnens Gård or where my transition truly began. 9-24 October 2015

Arriving in Prästabonnens Gård

It was Friday afternoon when I reached my destination; a bit tired and cold with sweat. Prästabonnens Gård turned out to be very different from Krogstorps Gård. First of all, by its location – it was at the entrance to a small village called Södra Rörum. There were forests nearby, but not as close as at Krogstorps, and a pretty lake a few kilometers away, where my hosts went fishing. Secondly, it was not a big animal farm, but rather a house with a nice permaculture garden, aquaponics, chickens and ducks. There were also a barn and a large cozy guesthouse used for volunteers, behind which was a natural swimming pool inhabited by frogs and a sauna.

My hosts were a couple of retired professors – Suzanne was an expert in linguistics (French, German and of course Swedish) and Folke, a specialist in human ecology, natural agriculture, sustainable living, grey water purification and permaculture. Folke for decades studied peak oil among other issues and translated John Seymours’ “Manual of Self-Sufficient Life.” They called Prästabonnens Gård a transition experiment as my hosts tried to live as self-sufficient and sustainable as possible. They used solar panels and burnt wood for heating both houses, used composts toilets (there was one in each house and one outside), recycled and composted what they could, collected rainwater, used electric car, grew vegetables and fruits in their permaculture garden, fished, made homemade bread, pickles and other preserves among other things. Within two days with an exciting feeling I already realized that I would learn a lot here; this place seemed to be a sign on my path that would guide me onto the right direction and my hosts were to be my first mentors on this new way.

folke and suzanne
With my hosts Suzanne and Folke

“You must be the change you hope to see in the world”

 When I arrived there was another volunteer on the farm – a Turkish girl Gökçe. We spent only three days together as she left home on Monday evening. There was not much time to get to know each other, although she seemed like a very nice girl and I felt good in her company. Yet, I could tell we were very much different. I just managed to get out of corporate life with a huge relief, while she was very soon about to start her new job for a big corporation and she was surely excited about it. It appeared to me that all the volunteers I met so far were doing WWOOFing for a bit different reasons than I was. They were interested in nature and organic farming, some grew up in the countryside, one of them even studied agriculture and planned to start his own farm, but I felt somehow even beyond that; my quest seemed to be rooted deep inside me for long time and now I was slowly uncovering its layers and understanding that its not only about being tired of the city and the bad quality of food, but very much being overwhelmed with the way we live nowadays, what became of our civilization, how we treat and destroy nature that is an inseparable part of us. I was always interested in environmental issues and following the news, but lately I started digging into the subject even more; watching documentaries and reading articles I became with each day more and more terrified, enraged and upset with what was going on around the world. I didn’t know yet what I wanted to do about it; I had at least a few options though. For instance with my experience I could look for work within NGO’s or Non-Profit Associations or Environmental-oriented news platforms; it would be probably difficult to get job in these places, but it was worth trying for sure. Though I felt that I didn’t want to go back to work in an office and life in the city, at least not yet. Besides I felt that the change should come first with me, like Gandhi said, “You must be the change you hope to see in the world.” I guess that’s why I decided I wanted to learn more about where it all starts – the roots of this planet, our soil and the food we grow. By farming ecologically we don’t pollute the earth and water, kill plants and beings, thus we don’t poison ourselves. I wanted to learn how we could live more sustainably and self-sufficiently without depending so much on non-renewable resources and maybe later share this knowledge with others. That’s also why I finally decided to write this online journal; hoping that maybe there is someone who shares the same thoughts and is wandering around the world asking same questions as I do, looking for answers I’m trying to find.transition experiment

Inspiring supper – discussing the world

On that very first Saturday at Prästabonnens Gård my hosts’ friend came for a visit. For a supper we had a delicious fish from the nearby lake prepared by Folke, who I soon discovered, cooked very well. We had a very nice conversation during the meal, talking a bit about what Gökçe and I do in life and how we ended up WWOOFing, and then with just one question the discussion entered on a different path. I believe that we were talking about environmental issues like climate change and so forth when I was asked how do I imagine the future of our planet. And there, intuitively feeling on a safe ground, even though I had been there for only 24 hours, I let myself absolutely honestly answer this question. Something I usually don’t dare to do, being afraid of the reaction of my listeners. Yet here, it seemed to neither surprise or shock; they just shook their heads in affirmation, said something in line with me and asked Gökçe the same question. From this moment on for me the real discussion began. We spoke about basically everything that had been bothering me for past months and I finally felt alliance with someone who not only didn’t consider my observations controversial or conspiratorial, but actually agreed with me and deepened my knowledge of these subjects. For the first time I heard about authors like John Michael Greer or real estimations of peak oil that Folke has been studying for about four decades already. Suddenly it turned out that both Folke and his friend knew one of my Couchsurfing hosts, Jessaia, as they all belonged to a small circle of people coordinating a Transition Movement/Towns Project here in Sweden. I heard about this movement for the first time from Jessaia and his girlfriend Ulrika just few days before. That night staying at their place we had similarly stimulating and inspiring discussion that cheerfully made me realize that there are more people thinking like me. I couldn’t believe this coincidence of them knowing each other; it felt like an evident confirmation that I was on the right path. I went to bed with my head spinning from excitement and thoughts about what we’ve spoke that night.

In the following days Folke lent me his books of John Micheal Greer on peak oil, John Seymour on self-sufficient life, and Bill Mollison on permaculture. Hungry for knowledge I greedily started reading almost all at once as I couldn’t decide where I should start. We went back on discussing these subjects with Folke and Suzanne almost everyday during our lunches and dinners. I felt like a student again, able to ask as many questions as I had and always receiving answers and explanations for them. Folke was to me like a wonderful walking encyclopedia that with a smile replied even to the most irrational questions I asked. I wish I knew more back then so that I could ask better questions. But at any rate I felt fully inspired and motivated to continue discovering more about permaculture, sustainability and self-sufficient living. Now I was even more convinced that we have to act fast and learn to use less or no non-renewable sources like oil and start to search for renewable energy, I promised myself to dedicate my time to learn more about this alterative world. I decided I would first go back to Barcelona, stay for a few days and see how I felt being back at home and only then make my next move. However, I already felt quite clear that I want to continue WWOOFing, looking specifically for permaculture and sustainable farms, which could give me a broader view on the possibilities of creating such a self-sufficient, peaceful and in harmony with nature place.

house

Once Gökçe left Suzanne and Folke asked me if I would like to stay for one week longer. From the very beginning I wanted to stay on their farm for two weeks and besides, now I also felt that I was in the right place to learn what I was looking for, so of course I said yes. During the day I was eagerly working in the garden, in the afternoon studying the books in awe with my eyes wide-open and in the evening we often discussed what I read over the supper. I felt like I was discovering a whole new world, excited and with head full of new ideas and plans that were unrolling one after another. Knowing that I’m not alone in my thinking suddenly gave me strength to push forward and to believe that it is the right thing to do. After all, it is always easier to go back from where you came than to enter a new path, right? Well, that’s at least what I like to think!

Happy to be back in nature. My last two weeks on the farm. September 2015

City vs. farm lifestyle

I was glad to be back in nature. My weekend trip made me realize that I don’t miss city life at all. The street noise and lights, polluted air, crowds of people always rushing somewhere, car traffic packed buses, long lines in supermarkets, advertising wherever you look, long hours and busy schedules, the society of spending-buying-consuming and good appearance. Of course it’s not only that. The city can be wonderful, enjoyable and fun! There is always something to do, events worth attending, movies that you should see, parties you can’t miss, bars and restaurants you have to visit and people you ought to meet. There are so many cool things going on in the city that you are never able to do all you want and plan. And if you do, afterwards you end up being more tired than happy. That’s at least my personal experience. So I ask myself – do I need all of that to be happy? Do I know how to relax and enjoy the moment? Well, I’m not sure, but I definitely know that all this rush and excitement of constant plans makes me tired, nervous and anxious. I don’t sleep well because of street noise and lights and I certainly go to bed too late and sleep too short. For now farm lifestyle wins 1:0 with the city.

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Photo by Taro 

I love to fall asleep in the peaceful quiet and wake up to the misty mornings and sounds of nature. I have never before experienced such silence as in Krogstorps Gård. At night when I was already lying down in my bed there were no sounds at all. At first it felt creepy, but soon I started to cherish it as the most beautiful music. Since the farm was located 2 km from the main road and it was hidden behind forests, lake and fields, there was no car noise at all. The only machines you could here were planes flying from time to time to the airport located about 40 km away. But besides that it was only nature’s symphony – crickets in the grass, birds singing, insects buzzing in the bushes, leaves moving on trees, sometimes cows mooing and goats bleating, deer howling in the woods… once you realized their existence, you heard everything that was moving over there. Incredible pleasure for all your senses.

The art of nature

What I liked the most about the surroundings of the farm was of course the lake and the forest. I took long walks and sat on the little boat piers looking into the water’s surface and at sunsets. It was a breathtaking view when the sky was turning all shades of red, orange, pink, and violet. Birds seemed to be little black squawking dots and the fish were stirring the water. Reeds slowly moving on the wind made relaxing sounds and my mind shifted away peacefully. On the other hand the woods were mysterious and dark. There is nothing else that smells as good as moist temperate mixed forest of the north. Tall pine trees and spruces, soil covered with soggy moss, and of course mushrooms in fall. The vastness of these forests made me feel little and vulnerable and my imagination was going wild. Often in the evenings when the air was cooling down and the sun was setting the mist would drift like ghosts through the ups and downs of the fields. If you were lucky you could also see a pair of deer coming out of the woods into pastures. As September is the beginning of the mating season, deer were howling loudly sometimes both day and night. It’s a terrifying sound when you hear it for the first time, especially without knowing from where and whom it comes from. Deer doesn’t sound like any animal known to me. Actually I don’t know if I could compare it to anything. But thanks to the mating season they were coming closer to the farm and I could often observe them from not too far. Absolutely beautiful creatures.

Before Isabelle left Krogstorps Gård we went on a small boat excursion. We borrowed the boat from the Peterslunds and rowed to one of the islands on the lake. We found evidence of beavers’ existence and hugged many trees (well, mostly I did the hugging.) On the way back… it was a bit tough, as we didn’t think before of rowing against the wind that was blowing pretty hard on that day. There were moments of consternation, but we made it to the shore. A few days later I made an extreme effort to wake up at 4.30 am and cycle in the total darkness winning over my fear of it (with all these scary sounds coming out of hollow blackness of the forest) to the Peterslunds’ farm where I met with Jerzy, a Polish volunteer, with whom I went fishing. We took the boat and rowed into the darkness of the lake observing how everything wakes up slowly. Man, the sunrise on the lake was a precious experience that I would repeat as many times as possible if I ever have the chance again.

New WWOOFer, horses and trip to Mariefred

A few days after Isabelle left, another WWOOFer arrived on our farm, Taro, a German-Japanese recent university graduate. We didn’t have many days to get to know each other very well as soon I left. However, the work together was peaceful and pleasant. We cleared the cucumber field and added animal compost to the soil, fought another war with caterpillars and prepared the stables for the arrival of the horses. Right! I didn’t mention yet that we were about to have two horses on our farm. A week earlier went with Hans to the horse farm from which we were taking the young one. I had an amazing experience as one of the horses fell asleep with its head on my chest when I was petting it. Wow, the connection with these animals is incredible and so calming. I hope that one day I will have a chance to do WWOOFing on a farm with horses. Ours arrived just a few days before I left. They were beautiful and a bit afraid at the beginning. They came from two different owners, but happily they got along without any problems or fights.

One day on the weekend we went with other volunteers on a trip to Mariefred. It’s a pretty town located about 35 km from our farms. It has the Royal Gripsholm Castle located by the lake (of course) and a railway museum that seems to be a big attraction there. During our walk around the town I found a cemetery where there stands a monument slab in memory of Polish soldiers fighting in the Second World War. History seems to be following us wherever we go.

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Photo by Taro

Last days on the farm and new WWOOF perspective

My last days on the farm were peaceful and quiet. I was thinking a lot about the cycling journey I was about to start soon. I didn’t feel like leaving the farm already, I wasn’t ready yet to go back to the city. Then, a brilliant though came to me. I will find another WWOOFing place in Sweden! The idea was great, but the weather was the problem. I badly wanted to cycle all the way to Copenhagen and that was around 700-800 km depending on the route and the weather was getting colder day by day. Riding in the rain and cold is not very pleasurable, I can tell that from my own experience in the Netherlands this May. I decided to search for a farm located close to the Danish boarder. Luckily there were three of them urgently looking for volunteers. Only one of them seemed to meet my expectations and besides it sounded very interesting. It was run by a couple of retired professors, one of which is a specialist in sustainable living, grey water purification and permaculture. It sounded like a great place for me, so I wrote to them. After few days of waiting they replied that I was welcome to come and stay with them for a week. Yes, so that was my new destination! Afer about 600 km of cycling ahead of me there was Prästabonnens Gård, my second WWOOFing experience.

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